Biodiversity Conservation Video

DNA’s role in timber tracking

Prof Andy Lowe talks at Adelaide Pecha Kucha Night 2014

In this public lecture, Prof Andy Lowe speaks about the use of DNA to potentially solve conservation problems, particularly with regards to timber tracking.

Rainforests, the lungs of the planet, clean massive amounts of air and water.

The conversion of these forests into agricultural and urbanised systems is inherently linked to illegal logging.

“This is not a bleeding heart conservation talk. This is a talk about hope… about how technology can help save some of our planet’s resources”, says Prof Lowe.

Prof Andy Lowe is a British-Australian scientist and expert in plants and trees, particularly the management of genetic, biological and ecosystem resources. He has discovered lost forests, championed to eliminate illegally logged timber in global supply chains, served the United Nation’s Office of Drugs and Crime and is a lead author of the Intergovernmental Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services – Land Degradation and Restoration report. He has helped secure a quarter of a billion dollars worth of research funding in his field and is an experienced and respected executive leader, board member, as well as mid-career mentor. Andy has been the Scientist in Residence at The Australian Financial Review since August 2018. Andy is inaugural Director of Agrifood and Wine at the University of Adelaide serving as the external face for food industry and government sector partnerships across Australia, and the world.

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